Wisdom From the Tradition: The Barmen Declaration – The Church Says ‘No!’

PR 6-26-16 imageJune 26, 2016
Park Ridge
Pastor Carol Breimeier

In Nazi Germany, the totalitarian Third Reich wanted to control the Christian Church along with everything else, going so far as to encourage the removal of the Old Testament from the Bible and “non-German” elements from worship. In May 1934, opposition church leaders met as the Confessing Church in the city of Barmen. Putting themselves and their livelihood at risk, they adopted a declaration asserting that Jesus Christ alone has authority over the Church, and, indeed, over all of human life.

1 Corinthians 13: Part 3 – Enduring Love

jun-12-imageJune 19, 2016
Park Ridge
Pastor Carol Breimeier

In beautiful, poetic language, Paul talks about the necessity of love, the qualities of love, and the eternal duration of love. We’ve heard the beauty in Paul’s words and also their challenge to the Christian community and the believers who populate it. Now we look at love in light of eternity.

1 Corinthians 13: Real Love

jun-12-imageJune 12, 2016
Park Ridge
Pastor Carol Breimeier

We’re at week two of a three-part series looking closely at the 13th chapter of St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, the famous chapter on love. In beautiful, poetic language, Paul talks about the necessity of love, the qualities of love, and the eternal duration of love. In this message, we come to Paul’s list of things that love is and things that love isn’t. One thing love isn’t is easy. Paul’s words, beyond their beauty, carry robust and challenging meaning for us, as they did for their original audience.

1 Corinthians 13: Love or Nothing

jun-5-image-prJune 5, 2016
Park Ridge
Pastor Carol Breimeier

We begin a three-part series looking closely at the 13th chapter of St Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, the famous chapter on love. In beautiful, poetic language, Paul talks about the necessity of love, the qualities of love, and the eternal duration of love. In this message and in those to follow, we’ll find that Paul’s words, beyond their beauty, carry robust and challenging meaning for us, as they did for their original audience.